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UNLV Libraries -> Architecture Studies Library-> Collections -> Las Vegas Guides and Collections -> Las Vegas driving tours -> UNLV

Self-guided walking tour #6:

1. Maude Frazier Hall
2. Flora Dungan Humanities
3. Student Union
4. UNLV Bookstore
5. Hank Greenspun School of Journalism and Media Studies
6. Paul B. Sogg Architecture Building
7. Student Recreation and Wellness Center
8. Thomas & Mack Center � Cox Pavilion
9. Student Services Complex
10. Claude I. Howard Academic Success Center
11. Classroom Building Complex
12. Central Desert Complex
13. Lied Library
14. Robert L. Bigelow Physics Building
15. Chemistry Building
16. Thomas Beam Engineering Complex
17. Juanita Greer White Hall
18. Rod Lee Bigelow Health Sciences Building
19. Lynn Bennett ... Center
20. Stan Fulton Building-International Gaming Institute
21. Science and Engineering Building
22. Foundation Building
23. Beam Music Center
24. Holbert H. Hendrix Education Auditorium
25. William D. Carlson Education Building
26. William S. Boyd School of Law
27. John S. Wright Hall
Print driving tour pamphlet: unlv06.doc Note: to print file choose landscape orientation

View UNLV Interactive Campus Building Map to see additional campus buildings




1. Maud Frazier Hall (1956)

Architects: Walter Zick and Harris Sharp Engineers and Architects (Original Design), Robert Larson (Remodel), Assemblage Studio (Remodel), also remodeled by a variety of design firms.

Frazier Hall named in honor of Maud Frazier, former Principal at Las Vegas High School , Clark County Legislator and early leader in funding of many Clark County School District and UNLV projects. One of the first campus buildings constructed when UNLV was called Nevada Southern University and part of University of Nevada Reno. Frazier Hall houses student enrollment and telecommunication functions. The Master Plan calls for the demolition of this building with its functions being moved to the Student Services Building additions. In its place, an entry mall to the campus and a structure for telecommunications will be built. This entry mall will open up the interior of UNLV to Maryland Parkway and Midtown UNLV beyond.

Photos by Paulette Nelson, 2003 and August , 2005

 

 



2. Flora Dungan Humanities (1970)

Architect: Walter Zick and Harris Sharp Engineers and Architects

Serving as a significant visual point for UNLV, this International Style building house administration, broadcasting, auditorium and classroom facilities. The public has a love/hate (mostly hate) response to the building. Built during height of asbestos use in the U. S. , it's expensive to maintain and remodel due to asbestos content. Currently shown in the master plan, this building may be a candidate for replacement in the future.





3. Student Union
Architect(s): Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects
Year: 2007


The old student union was built in 1969 when there were just 5000 students. But because of rapidly increasing student population at UNLV called for a construction of new student union. First phase was opened in summer 2006 and second phase opened doors for students in summer 2007. Total of 135,000 sq. ft. encourages group interactions and community building of diverse people and student organizations. Most public activity happens in the ground floor, it has retail stores, student seating areas, theater for 300 people. Second floor functions are mostly semi public with student lounges, computer labs, computing center, meeting spaces, ball room etc. Third floor is accessible to the public only during day because this floor has offices of student government, and other student organizations. Large extended balcony which runs through the length of the building in the second and plaza covered with the tensile canopy makes a beautiful space for various outdoor activities.


UNLV Facilities information







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4. UNLV Bookstore
Architect(s): Carpenter Sellers Architects
Year: 2001


The UNLV bookstore was remodeled and gained a 20,000 square-foot addition. A large plane protrudes from the bookstore and is supported by the wall enclosing the student union courtyard, creating a gateway to both the bookstore and the campus as a whole. The bookstore's sandstone veneer of the east façade, terra cotta-colored elements, and metal signage are similar to that of the Beam Music Center, helping to bridge the southern part of campus to the northern half. The courtyard between the bookstore and student union receives much more use thanks to the redirection of traffic brought upon by better site planning.







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5. Hank Greenspun School of Journalism and Media Studies
Architect(s): Robert A.M. Stern Architects Year: 2008

This building is named after Hank Greenspun, who is a visionary, founder and publisher of Las Vegas Sun daily newspaper. 117,000 sq. ft. of the building accommodates classrooms, advanced labs for editing, auditorium for 200 people and various other radio and TV broadcasting facilities. UNLV TV, campus cable station and KUNV campus FM radio station is also housed here. It holds programs like Communications Studies, Criminal Justice, Environmental Studies, Public Administration, Journalism and Media Studies, and Social Work. This building with the Engraved UNLV signage creates an edge to the campus. The central courtyard is approached by the 2 grand landscaped staircases and is covered with photovoltaic panels which meets most of the energy requirements of the building. Building fa�ade consists of tawny brick and red sandstone which represent the desert colors.

UNLV Facilities Information



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6. Paul B. Sogg Architecture Building
Architect(s): Swisher Hall Architects (Original Design) and Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini (Addition) Year: 1997, 2004

This 86,500 sq. ft. building houses the school of architecture and the Architecture Studies Library. Major financial contributors included Paul Sogg (local realtor), J.A. Tiberti (local construction professional), and Johnny Ribeiro (local developer and real estate professional). The original design was selected by competition; but the competition process led to protests concerning entries from local architects who were also faculty; thus creating a scenario of state employee vying for state work. These issues led to a court review of the competition process. The building includes large studio spaces, multiple computer labs, faculty and administrative offices, gallery space, and a 16,000 square-foot library. The studio windows on the west and east facades are narrow and vertical to reduce solar exposure. Large roof overhangs protect the main entrance and desert landscaping is used throughout the site. The library features extensive natural daylight thanks to large north-facing glazing. A 6,500 sq. ft. addition was designed by Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini and houses graduate studios and Landscape Architecture offices.

 

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7. Student Recreation and Wellness Center
Architect(s): DMJM Design/Hastings & Chivetta/Indigo Architecture
Year: 2007


Student recreation center opened the doors for students in September 2007. The total area of this building is about 185,000 sq. ft. having facilities more than a recreation center. As old Student Health Center needed up-gradation, in addition to that fitness and health are closely related, its requirements are added to the program of the new recreation center. The fitness facility includes well-equipped gym, indoor multi-purpose courts (for basketball, volley ball or badminton), futsal, 25 yard long natatorium, Jacuzzi, and many more. Health education offices, licensed pharmacy, fitness assessment labs, bio-feedback space, exam rooms counseling suites, conference room and offices etc are added under wellness category. Considering Las Vegas, building is oriented to have spectacular views of the strip and other surrounding areas from the jogging track. Natural lighting is maximized in the interiors and high performance glass is used to withstand extreme Vegas climate.

UNLV Facilities information




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8. Thomas & Mack Center � Cox Pavilion (1984 and 2001, respectively)

Architects: W2C Architects and Ellerbe Becket, respectively

The Thomas & Mack Center and the Cox Pavilion is a +18,000 seat and +4,000 seat, respectively, arenas that host NBA games, major concerts National Finals Rodeo, Professional Bull Riding events, conventions and other major events.

 




9. Reynolds Student Services Complex
Architect(s): Holmes Sabatini Associates (now Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini)
Year: 1994


This building acts as the gateway to the second north-south academic mall on the campus for students and visitors entering from the Thomas & Mack parking lot. A tall colonnaded canopy clearly defines the entrance. A skylight that resembles the top of a lighthouse provides natural daylight into the facility. This project won an AIA Nevada Design Award in 1995.








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10. ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER (ASC) (2008)Previously called the Claude I. Howard Student Health Services (1988 and 1994)
Architect: Holmes Sabatini (Now Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini)
Original Design
Carpenter Sellers (Addition)

A 2,840 gross square footage (2,246 useable space) out-patient facility providing health services to UNLV's students. This building contains examining rooms, a laboratory, a conference room and office facilities.

 



11. Carol C. Harter Classroom Building Complex
Architect(s): KGA Architecture, Tate and Snyder Architects (now Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects)
Year: 1995


This 168,000 square-foot complex is composed of three buildings referred to as the "A", "B", and "C" buildings. Each building has its own purpose and distinct shape. The round "A" building features multiple lecture halls, the rectangular "B" contains faculty offices for many departments, and the square "C" building houses classrooms. The "B" building is the tallest and screens the campus from Thomas & Mack. Due to a 15-foot slope the "C" building features entrances on both the second and first floors. A courtyard with a grand exterior staircase, benches, and planters for additional seating allow students a nice backdrop to socialize in between classes.





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12. Central Desert Complex
Architect(s): Assemblage Studios
Year: 2002


This complex of 12 modular buildings, each with 3,600 square-feet of space, was created to house faculty temporarily displaced from their facilities due to campus renovations. In order to make these buildings seem more permanent, they were set into a concrete slab instead of placed on blocks. This strategy also saved the architect from having to provide multiple stairs, ramps, and decks for each building. To help the modular units blend into their surroundings better, exterior elements were taken from neighboring buildings such as galvanized panels (Lied Library) and stucco coloring (residential buildings, the bookstore).




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13. Lied Library
Architect(s): Leo Daly Architects and Welles Pugsley Architects
Year: 2000


The massive $55.3 million ($15 million was donated by the Lied Foundation and its trustee C. Hixson), 302,000 square-foot library has become the jewel of the campus as UNLV strives to be recognized as a �premier metropolitan university�. Arguably one of the more technologically advanced libraries in the country, the Lied Library features an automated book retrieval system, media distribution system, digital id for library materials, and an Information Commons Area with over 100 computers, a five-story atrium space, and escalators. Lied Library contains 28 miles (153,000 linear ft.) of shelving, a 2 million volume capacity, and 800 hard wire network ports. The masonry veneer gives the building a sense of permanence while the reflective zinc cladding expresses the technological advancement found within. This project won an AIA Nevada Design Award in 1996.








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14. Bigelow Physics Building
Architect(s): Holmes Sabatini Associates (now Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini)
Year: 1994

This $11 million, 69,000 sq. ft. building used a berming strategy to maintain a low profile frontage along the mall. Its low profile reinforces open space instead of bringing attention to a specific building. Bigelow Physics house research, teaching, demonstration, and astronomy laboratories, as well as offices. Light wells with shading devices provide internal daylighting to public areas of the building. The laboratories are windowless with a specialized air filtration system, isolation of all sources of electrical interference, floor isolated from walls, and carefully controlled room temperatures. These features were incorporated into the design in order to protect sensitive lasers and other equipment from unwanted environmental influences. Several labs are equipped with traveling cranes capable of moving heavy equipment. Teaching and astronomy labs are on the second floor. All research laboratories are on the first floor and staggered along the southern wing to reduce corridor length and to create a semi-enclosed exterior courtyard. The building has an industrial-functional aesthetic with conduits and wires exposed throughout the building. This gives the impression of a work in progress, which is the case. As research projects change, communication and power lines can be moved to support new projects without extensively renovating the building. The building's �V' shape form provides separation of facility's functions. One wing contains mostly offices and lecture halls while the other wing houses laboratories, preparation rooms and shops. Many references to physics and mathematics can be found throughout the building. These references include a �sine curve� wall enclosing the south end of the courtyard, a two story sinusoidal glass wall facing the courtyard, colored banners representing the light spectrum hanging from the ceilings in public areas, and Isaac Newton's apple tree found in the main entry plaza. The building displays a machine-like aesthetic with its purity of form, simple material, and exposed mechanical and electrical systems. Vaulted roofs above laboratories are reminiscent of the Quonset huts used as early research facilities at Los Alamos , New Mexico where the atomic bomb was first tested during World War II. In the courtyard, palm trees placed in mathematical progression represent the expanding university posited by the Big Bang Theory. Concentric-colored concrete circles in the plaza radiate out like ripples from a pebble drop into calm water.






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15. Chemistry Building (1971)

Architects: JMA Architecture Studios

This $1.57 million, 47,500 sq. ft. building was partially submerged into the ground to serve as a fallout shelter in case of nuclear attack during the cold war as well as to address cut and fill site issues with berming. This design was chosen from a competition for its cutting edge design (for its era as well as the western U.S.) The building�s bold interior colors were considered unusual for science facilities in the 1970s.

Photos by Ernie Podaca, July, 2005

 

UNLV Facilities information





16. Thomas Beam Engineering Complex (1988)

Architects: Tate and Snyder (now Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects) and KGA Architects

This cast-in-place concrete structure houses the Engineering programs. The airplane hanging in the lobby was donated by the Hughes Corporation. The plane is a model of the H-1 racer built in the 1930s and designed to be the fastest plane for it's time. The plane obtained a speed of 352 mph in 1935 and set a transcontinental speed record in 1937 by traversing the U.S. in 7 hrs. 28 min. The plane contained technical innovations like flush rivets and retractable landing gear for reducing air drag on the aircraft. An $82 million, 200,000 sq. ft. expansion designed by Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini is scheduled to be completed in spring 2007. The expansion will be located on the north side of this facility.

Photos by Ernie Podaca, July, 2005







17. Juanita Greer White Hall (1974)

Architects: JMA Architecture Studios

Named after former State Legislator and University Regent Juanita Greer White, White Hall was designed to contain classrooms, offices and teaching laboratories. High enrollment in the biological sciences as well as retrofitting a large number of research laboratories in this building has put significant stress on the electrical and HVAC systems. This building is a candidate for a complete overhaul of its infrastructure and technical systems. White Hall houses the Wesley E. Niles Herbarium.

Photos by Paulette Nelson, 2003 and August , 2005

 

UNLV Facilities information






18. Rod Lee Bigelow Health Sciences Building (1992)

Architects: KGA Architects

Primarily used for health sciences and the nursing school, this building houses nursing and radiological laboratories, as well as offices, classrooms, and physical therapy training spaces.

Photos by Paulette Nelson, 2003 and August , 2005

 

UNLV Facilities information






19. Lynn Bennett Early Childhood Development Center (2003)

Architects: Eric Strain Architect (now Assemblage Studio)

This 20,000 sq. ft. �campus style� design located along the northern edge of UNLV�s main campus was selected in a design competition for this project. The center houses offices, classrooms, and playgrounds. This school is designed as a �campus within a campus.� A central play area surrounded by buildings gives children a safe place to play. The school house design expands on the �One Room School House� concept. The location of private gardens in front of the classrooms serves to blur the lines between �the classroom and outdoor environment. These structures were designed to take advantage of the sun and provide natural light for indoor school activities. This project received the AIA 2001 Honor Award in the unbuilt category.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






20. Stan Fulton Building-International Gaming Institute (2000)

Architects: JMA Architecture Studios

This 35,000 square-foot building is located at the northwest corner of the UNLV campus, making it the closest academic building to the Strip. A visual and academic link is formed between the gaming industry and the UNLV campus because of the types of classes taught within the Gaming Institute. West-facing balconies and an observation tower allow for panoramic viewings of the Strip. Buttresses located on the west fa�ade provide structural support and shading for the windows. The building�s exterior CMU and steel are gray and red to represent UNLV�s colors.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






21. Science and Engineering Building (2008)

Architects: Dekker Perich Sabatini

The department of Engineering and science is in demand due to the new growth and economic diversification in Nevada. The new building is approved to meet these requirements and support the collaborative research of various disciplines. This building acts as a platform for the faculty and students to work with companies and other universities to compete with the well respected universities of the nation and keep the name of UNLV higher. The building houses hi-tech conference rooms, laboratories, teaching spaces, offices, integrated research areas totaling the gross area to 205,779 sq. ft. The spaces and the research labs in this building are extremely flexible to accommodate research of diverse fields. The versatility of the building even extends to the corridor and other meeting spaces which could be altered temporarily to suite the comfort of the participants. This building is one of the first Green buildings on campus aiming for LEED silver rating. Some of the sustainable features are 20% of energy saving, 40% of water savings, reuse of reverse osmosis water waste and green building material is used in some areas of the building.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






22. Foundation Building (1999)

Architects: Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects

This 20,000 square-foot, Pasadena style building located in the northeast corner of campus houses the nonprofit organization that raises private funds for UNLV. One side of the building contains office space while the other has event rooms. The two main masses are separated by a courtyard that functions as public space. Even though the facility features a state-of-the-art audiovisual system, the building stands out on campus because of its traditional, low-key styling and appearance. Many large campus events are held in the Foundation Blascoe Events wing.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






23. Beam Music Center (2001)

Architects: Dekker Perich Holmes Sabatini

The 35,000 square-foot, $7.3 million Beam Music Center has established itself as the northeast gateway to the campus with its striking 52-foot-tall sandstone veneer wall creating a strong presence. The building�s lobby cuts perpendicularly through the building, allowing passing pedestrian and vehicular traffic to catch a glimpse of the goings on within. The building�s program includes a 300- seat recital hall, two large rehearsal spaces, studios and practice rooms, recording studio, and a music library. This facility holds the largest pipe organ in Nevada. This project won AIA Nevada Design Awards in 2002 and 1997.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






24. & 25. Holbert H. Hendrix Education Auditorium and William D. Carlson Education Building (1970)

Architects: JMA Architecture Studios

This +100,000 sq. ft. building houses the College of Education with spaces for general use auditoriums, classrooms, offices and laboratories for education programs. The Carlson Education building also houses the Curriculum Materials Library serving students majoring in Curriculum and Instruction. This cast-in-place concrete building has stood up well in terms of overall structure but is difficult and costly to renovate. Cast-in-place concrete was commonly used in campus building construction in the 1960�s and 1970�s. The Carlson Education building is considered the best historic example of a cast-in-place concrete in southern Nevada.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






26. William S. Boyd School of Law (1961, 1965 two-story addition, 1979 north wing addition, 2002 Law School Remodel)

Architects: James B. McDaniel Architects (Original Design and Two Floor Addition), JMA Architecture Studios (North Wing Addition), and Welles Pugsley Architects (Law School Remodel)

Originally called the James Dickinson Library, the cylindrical form and first floor of the complex were built in 1961. The law school moved to this facility in 2002 and the building was renamed the William S. Boyd School of Law. The north wing houses the Rogers Center for Administration and Justice containing several departments with additional space to expand as needed. Within 2 years of accreditation, the Law School has become ranked as a top 100 Law School nationally.

Photos by Paulette Nelson

 

UNLV Facilities information






27. John S. Wright Hall (1965, 2004-2005 Remodel and Addition)

Architects: James B. McDaniel Architects (Original Phase), KGA Architect (Remodel & Addition)

Wright Hall, named in 1976 in honor of John S. Wright, founding faculty member and history professor at UNLV, contains classrooms, an auditorium and offices for Anthropology, History, Business and other Liberal Arts departments. Wright Hall was one of the first building on campus to go wireless. With the recently completed $19.7 million renovation and addition, this building now serves approximately 5,000 Liberal Arts students. The building incorporates sandstone cues, which are becoming a more prominent material in UNLV campus design.

Photos by Paulette Nelson



Self-guided walking tour #6:

1. Maude Frazier Hall
2. Flora Dungan Humanities
3. Student Union
4. UNLV Bookstore
5. Hank Greenspun School of Journalism and Media Studies
6. Paul B. Sogg Architecture Building
7. Student Recreation and Wellness Center
8. Thomas & Mack Center � Cox Pavilion
9. Student Services Complex
10. Claude I. Howard Academic Success Center
11. Classroom Building Complex
12. Central Desert Complex
13. Lied Library
14. Robert L. Bigelow Physics Building
15. Chemistry Building
16. Thomas Beam Engineering Complex
17. Juanita Greer White Hall
18. Rod Lee Bigelow Health Sciences Building
19. Lynn Bennett ... Center
20. Stan Fulton Building-International Gaming Institute
21. Science and Engineering Building
22. Foundation Building
23. Beam Music Center
24. Holbert H. Hendrix Education Auditorium
25. William D. Carlson Education Building
26. William S. Boyd School of Law
27. John S. Wright Hall

Print driving tour pamphlet: unlv06.doc Note: to print file choose landscape orientation

Prepared May, 2003 by Liz Fuentes, UNLV School of Architecture Graduate Student
New images, 12 buildings added July 2005 by Ernie Podaca and Paulette Nelson
    Sources:
  • Anderton, Frances and Chase, John. Las Vegas: A Guide to Recent Architecture. London: Ellipsis London Limited, 1997.
  • Frommer, David. May 2005. UNLV Campus Tour, Version 3. TMs (photocopy). Architecture Studies Library, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas.
  • Nevada Design Awards materials from the American Institute of Architects, Las Vegas Chapter.
  • Nicoletta, Julie. Buildings of Nevada. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.



Monday, 17-Dec-2012 10:50:37 PST