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  UNLV Libraries -> Architecture Studies Library-> Collections -> Las Vegas Guides and Collections -> Las Vegas driving tours (self guided)

Self guided tour #2: North and Northeast Las Vegas
1. Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy
Back to the self-guided tours of Las Vegas
Map of North and Northeast Las Vegas
2. Doolittle Community Center Renovation & Addition
3. West Las Vegas Library
4. City of North Las Vegas Fire Station #52
5. CCSN Cheyenne Campus, Phase V
6. Clark County Family Courts & Services Center
7. Sunrise Library
8. Las Vegas Temple-Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
9. Kyle ( Kiel ) Ranch

10.Don W. Reynolds Girl Scout Training & Service Center

11. Regional Animal Campus
Print driving tour pamphlet: northlv02.doc Note: to print file choose landscape orientation



1.
Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy
Architect(s): Phase I - Jon J. Jannotta Architects & Planners, Inc.
Phase II � Carpenter Sellers Associates
Address: 1201 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Year: 2001


This multi-phased project will eventually encompass 7.8 acres and provide facilities for students from grades K-12. Currently grades 3-6 attend this charter school, which is located in a socio-economically challenged area of town. The first phase of the project features a 30,000 square-foot building with multiple classrooms, a library, and administrative offices. The computer classroom area and library feature clerestory windows to allow natural light into the space. The selected building materials (CMU, steel, and storefront glazing) helped keep the cost of the school reasonable.

The second construction phase features a two story, 61,000 sf multi-use building, housing the middle school, cafeteria/multipurpose room, music classrooms, storage and administration offices. The third phase will be completed by Carpenter Sellers Associates.

This project won a 2004 AIA Nevada Design Award, Citation Award in the Built category and the Southwest Contractor, Best of 2004, Education K-12 Project (Tie) award.




Top photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003), Second photo by Carpenter Sellers (July 2004).

 

Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy


Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy- Phase II

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2. Doolittle Community Center Renovation & Addition
Architect(s): Welles Pugsley Architects
Address: 1950 N. J St.
Year: 2002


The Doolittle Community Center, located in a tough neighborhood plagued by crime, received a much-needed facelift and addition. The 52,800 square-foot facility now boasts an unusual façade on its J Street entrance; a curved, metal clad wall runs almost the entire length of complex. There are two crescent cutouts in the metal wall that allow entrance into the building and the courtyard features a new pool. The wall also links the community center to the existing senior center. The new facility is intended to be both welcoming and supportive of the community in which it resides.


Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).




Doolittle Community Center Renovation & Addition

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3. West Las Vegas Library
Architect(s): Arturo Cambeiro, Architect
Address: 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd.
Year: 1989


One of the older branch libraries, the West Las Vegas Library is an important part of the community it serves along with the Doolittle Community Center and Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy. The library features a 300-seat theater, gallery, and conference room for public use. The copper-colored metal roof is the most striking architectural element of the building. The entrance features a sharply pitched canopy and roof that resembles the roof of a mountain chalet instead of a library in the desert. Aqua trim and pink concrete block, textured and regular, are the other major building materials.

Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).



West Las Vegas Library

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4.
City of North Las Vegas Fire Station #52
Architect(s): Carpenter Sellers Associates
Address: 4110 Losee Rd.
Year: 1995


This striking 15,000 square-foot fire station is located in a light commercial and industrial section of North Las Vegas. One of the project's challenges was offering a design that was architecturally prominent yet could be expanded in the future if needed. Another challenge was designing a functional fire station that could eventually be used for commercial purposes one day. The bold forms drew inspiration from past fire stations, fire-fighting equipment, and commercial and industrial architecture of the area. The colors were selected to complement the desert palette and reflect the predominantly Hispanic heritage of the neighborhood. The building materials are stainless steel, steel, concrete, wood and corrugated metal.

 

Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).

 




City of North Las Vegas Fire Station #52

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5.CCSN Cheyenne Campus, Phase V
Architect(s): Tate & Snyder Architects (now Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects)
Address: 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave.
Year: 1995


The Phase V structure was added to the existing campus and intended to help establish a strong identity for the campus. It houses the Culinary Arts Department, their restaurant, faculty offices, a computer learning center, and classroom space. The distinctive, wedge-shaped entrance lobby is clad in aluminum and features an elevated walkway, which connects the new building to the existing one. This project has won three AIA Nevada Design Awards in the years 1996, 1995, and 1994.


Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).


CCSN Cheyenne Campus, Phase V


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6. Clark County Family Courts & Services Center
Architect(s): Tate & Snyder Architects (now Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects)
Address: 601 N. Pecos Rd.
Year: 1994


This 102,500 square-foot facility connects to two existing structures to create a judicial complex serving troubled children and their families. The design intent was to create an approachable building that still conveyed the formality of a courthouse. The main entrance is located on the east side of the site, fronting Pecos Road. Guests, employees, and visitors enter the complex through a small building with security equipment and personnel. A covered atrium space with a pitched roof connects three building together. The exterior of the building consists of stucco, brick, and textured CMU block.

Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).



Clark County Family Courts & Services Center


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7.
Sunrise Library
Architect(s): Architronics (principal was David Welles now of Welles Pugsley Architects)
Address: 5400 Harris Ave.
Year: 1987


The design of this 22,000 square-foot branch library was influenced by the profile and colors of nearby Sunrise Mountain. Partially raised sections of the roof feature clerestories that provide natural daylight into the building while mimicking a mountain range. The facility also has a small gallery and auditorium with a stage. A covered walkway leads from the main entrance to the parking lot. Located in between a high school and an elementary school, the Sunrise Library has become a popular place for students and a welcome addition to the community.



Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).




Sunrise Library

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8.
Las Vegas Temple-Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
Architect(s): Tate & Snyder Architects (now Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects)
Address: 827 Temple View Dr.
Year: 1989


Located at the base of Sunrise Mountain, the Mormon Temple can be seen across the Las Vegas valley with its large white profile contrasting against the reddish-brown tones of the mountain. The building's exterior is constructed of precast concrete and marble panels. Six gold-capped gothic-like spires rise above the roof. Unfortunately, this building can be appreciated only from the outside since the temple grounds are open to the public and the interior spaces are not.


Photo provided by Liz Fuentes (July 2003).

 


Las Vegas Temple-Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints


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9. Kyle ( Kiel ) Ranch (1875) Architect(s): John S. Parker
Address: Carey & Losee Rd. Nevada Historical Marker 224

Established by Conrad Kiel, the ranch was one of two major ranches in the Las Vegas Valley during the late 1800s. In 1911, John S. Parker bought the ranch and built a white mansion. The mansion burnt down in 1992, but the original adobe structures survived. The adobe structures are considered some of the oldest standing structures in Las Vegas . These buildings were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.


Images provided by Paulette Nelson (July 2004).


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10. Don W. Reynolds Girl Scout Training & Service Center
Architect(s): Carpenter Sellers Associates
Address: 2941 29th St.

The architect's objective was to design a building that integrates the needs of the foundation and satisfies their requirements for grant consideration. During the design process several goals and concepts emerged: First, the building entry and gallery spaces were designed to reflect and display the history of the Girl Scouts of Frontier Council. Second, a concept of educating the user of the building by leaving the building's systems exposed for viewing. Finally, the building is designed to complement its site and utilizes sustainable design and daylighting techniques. The building design won a 2004 AIA Nevada Design Award in the Built category.


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11. Regional Animal Campus
Architect: Tate Snyder Kimsey Architects
Address: 3000 Harris Ave.


This consolidated animal-care campus, located adjacent to the existing Lied Animal Shelter, is intended to serve the animal sheltering and adoption needs for the entire region. The recently completed dog adoption park houses adoptable dogs in groups of 10 - 12 within a community of 22 bungalows. The central goals for the campus include a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals, in an attempt to improve the chances for adoption, and a sustainable design solution that strives to reflect the client's vision of environmental responsibility. To meet this objective, the project was developed in accordance with LEED Platinum-level standards for sustainability. This project received the 2005 AIA Nevada Honor Award in the Built Category




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Sources:
Anderton, Frances, and John Chase. Las Vegas:A Guide to Recent Architecture. London: Ellipsis London Limited, 1997.
Las Vegas American Institute of Architects Design Awards Archives
Nicoletta, Julie. Buildings of Nevada. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
[Online]. Available: http://dcnr.nv.gov/markers/mark_224.htm Accessed June 16, 2004.
Howell, Stacey. "Re: Additional Projects for UNLV Architecture Library." Email to Jeanne Brown. 12 July 2004.

© UNLV ASL
Tour pamphlets prepared May, 2003 by Liz Fuentes, UNLV School of Architecture Graduate Student
Revised 6/04 by Ernie Podaca, UNLV School of Architecture Graduate Student

 






Monday, 17-Dec-2012 10:50:34 PST