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UNLV Libraries -> Architecture Studies Library -> Las Vegas Guides and Collections ->
AIA Nevada Design & Service Awards Archive -> 2009 awards -> UNLV Science and Engineering Building

 
NEVADA AIA DESIGN AWARDS 2009





 
Entry number: B09005
Project Name: UNLV Science and Engineering Building
Building Type: Laboratory / Classrooms / Offices
Completion Date: September 2008
Building Location: 200 N. 28th St. Las Vegas, NV 89101
Type of Construction: Type II - F.R.
Materials Used: Stucco, precast concrete, stone veneer, metal panels
Building Area: 200,000 sf

Design Team:
Architecture Firm: Dekker, Perich, Sabatini
Architect of Record: Christopher W. Larsen, AIA
Client/Owner/Developer:
State Public Works Board
Interior Designer: Dekker, Perich, Sabatini
Landscape Architect:
Dekker, Perich, Sabatini
Structural Engineer: Roger Hyytinen
Electrical Engineer: Tim Flanagan
Mechanical Engineer: Alex Jankovic
Civil Engineer: Joe Dietz
General Contractor: Sletten Companies
Photographer: Kirk Gittings Photography
Laboratory Planning: Ken DeBoer, Tom Giuggio
Conceptual MEP Engineering and Commissioning: Ric Holman
Acoustical: Mark Odneal, Jim Johnson
Cost Estimating: Justin Peterson
LEED: Jason Steinbock

Statement of Design Approach:
UNLV set forth a series of macro-themes to focus the direction of research and education on campus with a focus on cross-disciplinary thematic research. Therefore, the mission for the UNLV Science and Engineering Building is to increase the visibility of science and engineering on the UNLV campus. Designed as an interactive environment in which collaborative research is conducted, it is intended to be a facility for discovering, transforming and disseminating new knowledge; one that reflects the flexible, adaptive, multidisciplinary character of modern technical research and learning. The building is envisioned to encourage learning by members of the larger campus and local communities to become a part of the interactive academic landscape of the facility. It is a welcoming focal point for learning by the widest possible collection of stakeholders. Over time, the building will not only foster, but expand the scope and accessibility of knowledge, research, and learning within the science and engineering disciplines.

Narrative:
Future growth and economic diversification in southern Nevada is placing increased demands on the engineering and science colleges at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. To meet these needs, UNLV acquired approval for a new academic research building, an interactive environment in which collaborative research in science and engineering is to be conducted. Designed to achieve a LEED Silver rating from the U.S. Green Building Council, the Science and Engineering Building is the first LEED Silver laboratory building in the State of Nevada.

The new, four-story, 200,000 sf Science and Engineering Building facilitates increased disciplinary interaction, enables better space allocation management, and provides efficient facilities. The building offers more versatile spaces, less defined by discipline, therefore encouraging interaction among researchers. These areas range from Internet-based teleconferencing centers, with at least one large, fully instrumented conference room, to smaller spaces where a handful of faculty and students can gather to share the progress of their work. Many universities and private companies have embraced this new research paradigm with unified centers of science and engineering.

Because the future of science and engineering research is unpredictable, the research building is equipped with dynamically allocated space. Space must be easily convertible from one use to another, so that today’s “wet” lab can seamlessly and economically become a “dry” lab tomorrow. Large, fixed furnishings as well as mechanical distribution is placed along the exterior walls or interior corridors, with sinks and hoods in the corners and all other parts of the laboratory remaining open. Movable furniture, benches that are suitable for group work, and ubiquitous power and data outlets, help create a space that can easily be adapted for a diversity of research applications.

Sustainable Description:
Future growth and economic diversification in southern Nevada is placing increased demands on the engineering and science colleges at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. To meet these needs, UNLV acquired approval for a new academic research building, an interactive environment in which collaborative research in science and engineering is to be conducted. Designed to achieve a LEED Silver rating from the U.S. Green Building Council, the Science and Engineering Building is the first LEED Silver laboratory building in the State of Nevada.

The new, four-story, 200,000 sf Science and Engineering Building facilitates increased disciplinary interaction, enables better space allocation management, and provides efficient facilities. The building offers more versatile spaces, less defined by discipline, therefore encouraging interaction among researchers. These areas range from Internet-based teleconferencing centers, with at least one large, fully instrumented conference room, to smaller spaces where a handful of faculty and students can gather to share the progress of their work. Many universities and private companies have embraced this new research paradigm with unified centers of science and engineering.

Because the future of science and engineering research is unpredictable, the research building is equipped with dynamically allocated space. Space must be easily convertible from one use to another, so that today’s “wet” lab can seamlessly and economically become a “dry” lab tomorrow. Large, fixed furnishings as well as mechanical distribution are placed along the exterior walls or interior corridors, with sinks and hoods in the corners and all other parts of the laboratory remaining open. Movable furniture, benches that are suitable for group work, and ubiquitous power and data outlets, help create a space that can easily be adapted for a diversity of research applications

 

 

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Material in ASL Library: Form Core Boards, Project Description Form, Exteriors Photos, Location Map, Site Plan, Floor Plan, and Interior Photos

These images are low-resolution reproductions of the images provided for the AIA Nevada Design Awards. All materials should be considered copyrighted and may not be reproduced or used without permission.






Monday, 17-Dec-2012 10:50:05 PST