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UNLV Libraries -> Architecture Studies Library -> Las Vegas Guides and Collections ->
AIA Nevada Design & Service Awards Archive -> 2008 awards

 
NEVADA AIA DESIGN AWARDS 2008





 

Entry number: B08051
Project Name: University of Nevada, Reno Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center
Building Type: Educational
Completion Date: May 2008
Architect: Hershenow & Klippenstein Architects / Dekker/Perich/Sabatini, Ltd.
Building Location: University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV 89557

Design Team:
Electrical Engineer: PK Electrical
Landscape Architect: Dekker/Perich/Sabatini, Ltd.
General Contractor: Q&D Construction, Inc.
Structural Engineer: Hyytinen Engineering
Civil Engineer: Odyssey Engineering
Interior Designer: Dekker/Perich/Sabatini, Ltd.
Photographer: Vance Fox Photography
Mechanical Engineer: Ainsworth Associates
Security Consultant: Teecom Design Group

Statement of Design Approach:
The Mathewson - IGT Knowledge Center is designed to be an anchor for the Mid-Campus providing the transition from the academic to the social/athletic areas on campus. The program for the facility and its location at the proposed new Mid-Campus entry resulted in a facility that is porous to the users, focusing the higher public uses on the many entries and activating both interior and exterior spaces. The building's image provides a contemporary 21st century response while acknowledging the monumentality appropriate for a university library and the original 'brick and mortar' buildings on campus that are so popular with the community.

The sloping site proved challenging to provide the porosity of multiple entrances while maintaining accessibility. As a result, with the exception of the tower entry, the majority of the first floor is underground and additional entrances are provided both on the second and third floors. The Knowledge Center's design focuses on providing excellent daylighting and acoustics. Skylights and clerestory windows supply daylight to the central atrium, which also functions as an organizing space or 'way-finding' device for patrons to use in navigating and understanding the large floor plates.

The construction cost for the 296, 766 square foot building totaled $77,300,000.00 for a cost per square foot of $260.47.

Narrative:
This high-tech facility has a number of interesting features: The Knowledge Center utilizes a unique Automated Storage and Retrieval System (ASRS) to efficiently manage the collection and ultimately provide more space for study and collaboration. Students select materials from an online catalog, and they are retrieved and eventually re-shelved by a robotic system. Other high-tech elements include digital classrooms, video conferencing and collaboration rooms with plasma screens, hundreds of public computer stations, and a series of specialized computer labs.

The Knowledge Center is also designed to be a place to relax and socialize, with a café, auditorium and numerous other gathering places including many traditional 'quiet' reading rooms.

The facility is also designed to showcase the university's extensive art collections. Exhibition spaces include an outdoor sculpture garden and a first floor art gallery with a hanging art system and niches that support rotating exhibits, rare books, and photography.

The Mathewson - IGT Knowledge Center is expected to set a new precedent for seamlessly integrating active, collaborative spaces and advanced technology while retaining the feel of a traditional library.

Sustainable Description:
The Mathewson - IGT Knowledge Center incorporates many sustainable aspects.

Daylight Harvesting
The Knowledge Center's design focuses on providing excellent daylighting. Skylights and clerestory windows supply daylight to the central atrium which provides much, if not all, of the lighting required for the surrounding spaces during daylight hours. Glazing solutions for the building were well researched resulting in different high performance glazing selected for each orientation. Exterior shading devices and light shelves are utilized on south glazing.

Computer Controlled Systems
Lighting controls that sense natural lighting levels and adjust fixture output are used in public spaces along with occupancy sensors in office areas. Each stack aisle is controlled by an occupancy sensor that automatically dims the fixtures up and down based on aisle occupancy.

The west side provides shading for the west facing glazing. Roller shades controlled by a computer controlled astronomical clock also aid in reducing glare and heat gain from the west.

Direct Digital Control of the HVAC systems reduces operating cost. The Plumbing system uses the latest in low flow technology.

Reduction of 'Commuter Miles'
From the beginning of the design process in the fall of 2000, one of the original goals of the building was to support a change in the campus culture from a 'commuter' campus to a more self sustaining environment where students have reasons to stay on campus. In addition to its repository of books and journals, the facility also offers digital classrooms, video conferencing and collaboration rooms with plasma screens, hundreds of public computer stations, and a series of specialized computer labs as well as place to relax and socialize, with a café, auditorium and numerous other gathering places including many traditional 'quiet' reading rooms. These offerings support the 'stay-on-campus' goal and ultimately reduce 'commuter miles'.

Reduction of Materials & Waste
The building utilizes a unique Automated Storage and Retrieval System (ASRS) to efficiently manage the collection and provide more space for study and collaboration. Students select materials from an online catalog, and they are retrieved and eventually re-shelved by a robotic system. This system is 7 to 10 times more efficient in storing the collection compared to traditional book stacks and as such, saved the project over 100,000 square feet. High capacity mobile compact storage systems were also employed in the Basque Collections and in the Special Collections. These systems also reduce the amount of materials used and the waste created.

 

 

 

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Material in ASL Library: Form Core Boards, Project Description Form, Exteriors Photos, Location Map, Site Plan, Floor Plan, and Interior Photos

These images are low-resolution reproductions of the images provided for the AIA Nevada Design Awards. All materials should be considered copyrighted and may not be reproduced or used without permission.






Monday, 17-Dec-2012 10:50:04 PST